WINTER MARKET (DELIVERY DAY: SATURDAY, March 19th)

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Spring is around the corner and our outdoor market is coming up! Save the date for May 7th for the first day of the LU Farmers’ Market in Downtown Jefferson City. New Location: East High Street (in front of the Cole County Court House) .

Don’t miss the opportunity to have some local goodness for our last two winter market vendor drop off dates. Get some pecans for a pecan pie or delicious chicken, pork, beef tamales and much more!

We are accepting vendor applications for the 2016-2017 season. Available here

Do you want to order? Choose from the shopping list and send your order to:  jacomealvarezm@lincolnu.edu. Orders must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, March 16th.

Pick up your items on Saturday, March 19th, from 9:00 to 10:00 am in Suite B, Room 120, Lorenzo Greene Hall, 900 Leslie Boulevard (Indoor Market).

 When ordering, please include the item, quantity, and the vendor’s name plus your telephone number in case that we need to reach you for last-minute changes.

Don’t forget to stop by our tasting table at the entrance of the room 120. There is coffee, tea and something to taste from the market! Walk-in customers are welcome from 9:00 to 10:00 am.

 Click here for the Market Shopping List for delivery on March 19th 2016 

Winter Market (Delivery Day: Saturday, February 20th)

IMG_2264Our outdoors market is coming up! Save the date for May 7th. The LU Farmers market, sponsored by Cooperative Extension, has been promoting and supporting sustainable practices. Know your food and your farmers!

Now accepting vendor applications for 2016-2017

If you want to order, choose from the shopping list and send an e-mail with your order to:  jacomealvarezm@lincolnu.edu. Orders must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 17th

Pick up your items on Saturday, February 20th, from 9:00 to 10:00 am in Suite B, Room 120, Lorenzo Greene Hall, 900 Leslie Boulevard (Indoors Market).

Below is our UPDATED shopping list for delivery on February 20th. When ordering, please include the item, quantity, and the vendor’s name plus your telephone number in case that we need to reach you for last-minute changes.

Don’t forget to stop by our tasting table at the entrance of the room 120. There is coffee and tea every market! Walk-in customers are welcome from 9:00 to 10:00 am.

 Market Shopping List for delivery on February 20th 2016

Invermos Valley Farms

100% natural beef, USDA inspected and pasture raised!

  • Tootie’s Trail Dust meat rub $5.99 for 7 oz. bottle
  • Ribeye steak -$15.99/lb.
  • T-bone steak – $15.99/lb.
  • Sirloin steak – $10.99/lb.
  • Ground round – $6.99/lb.
  • Ground chuck – $6.75/lb.
  • Ground beef $5.75/lb.
  • Beef and bacon brats – $7.99/lb.
  • Fajita strips – $8.50/lb.
  • Beef bacon – $10.99/lb.
  • Brisket – $7.50/lb.
  • All roasts – $6.99/lb.
  • Osso bucco $5.99/lb.
  • Stew meat – $4.99/lb.
  • Liver – $4.99/lb.
  • Soup bones – $3/lb.

Fully Cooked Products!!!

  • All-beef hotdogs – $8.99/lb.
  • Summer Sausage 8 oz. pkg.- $7.00
  • Smoked brisket – 12 oz. – pkg. $9.99
  • BBQ beef 1 lb. pkg. – $9.99/lb.
  • Pepperoni slices – $9.50/lb.

Poultry Corner

  • Ground turkey $6.99/lb.
  • Chicken bacon ranch Brat $6.99
  • Pasture raised turkey $4.50/lb.
  • Pasture raised chicken $4.50/lb.

Premium Burger Blends

Made from grinding whole muscle cuts to create a flavor profile we thought you would enjoy! We have several blends available.

  • INVO1 chuck, brisket, sirloin, ribeye, short rib
  • INVO3 chuck, brisket, short rib
  • INVO4 chuck, bacon
  • INVO5 chuck, sirloin

Available in the meat case in 1 pound packages $8.00 each

Our steaks are one inch thick. The roasts are typically 2-2.5 pounds each. Ground beef is one pound per pack and is typically 85% lean. Visit our website at www.missourinaturalbeef.com for beef bundles, bulk orders.

Mrs. Pam Schmutzler

Oatmeal Bread = $4.00

1 lb. Native Pecans halves = $10.00

Eggs $3.00

Kale $2.50 for 1/2 lb.

 Mrs. Mae Benson

Baked goods

  • Multi-Grain Bread (freshly milled hard red and white wheat berries and organic Kamut)

Extra large 2 lb. loaf  $8.50            Medium Loaf     $ 4.25

Extra large Cranberry 2 lb. loaf   $ 9.00

  • Ezekiel Fasting Bread (freshly milled spelt, red wheat berries, beans, barley, millet and lentils)

Large Loaf $ 5.00        Small Loaf $ 2.25

  • Conejoe’s Cookies (Freshly milled whole grain and crispy oat) 1 Dozen large    $ 6.00
  • Banana Nut Bread (Freshly milled whole grain) large $ 5.00
  • Pasta (freshly milled organic Kamut)  $ 2.50/bag
  • Kale Krisps 5 oz. bag  $ 3.50

Ed Rakow – Rakow Family Farm

Baked goods and vegetables

 

  • Eggs $2.50 med $3.00 lg. or $3.50 xlg.
  • Breads: banana, zucchini or pumpkin  $2.50/loaf
  • Swiss chard or kale $3/pkg.
  • Herbs $1.00 / bag, parsley, sage, rosemary.
  • Stewing old chickens  $7.50 each

Hugh’s Kitchen

  • Tamales, pork, chicken, beans w/cheese & tomato sauce ($2.50 each)
  • Sweet potato pies ($2.50 each)
  • Apple pies ($4.50 each)
  • Pineapple upside-down cake muffins ($2.50 each large, $1.50 small)
  • Blueberry swirls ($1.00 each)
  • Coffee cake muffins ($1.50 each)
  • Carrot cake large muffins ($2.50)

Native Plants Program (Cooperative Extension)

Lincoln University

  • Persimmon cookies 1 dozen large $6.00
  • 7 Persimmon cookies $ 2.50

Steve & Colleen Meredith- Ozark Yankee 

Grass fed and finished beef

No antibiotics or hormones

www.ozarkyankee.wordpress.com

  • T-bone Steaks @ $15.99/lb., packages average ¾ pound
  • Porterhouse Steaks @ $15.99/lb. , packages average 1 pound

Goat Milk Candy

  • Goat Milk Caramels, 50 cents each. Minimum $5.00 order (10 caramels – individually wrapped)
  • Goat Milk Fudge – Minimum 1/2 lb. order (can be a mix of flavors)
  • Chocolate $12.00 per lb.
  • Chocolate with Walnuts $15.00 per lb.
  • Peanut Butter $12.00 per lb.

Duncan Family Farm

“Taste the Excellence”

www.duncanfamilyfarm.com

  • 6 dozen eggs **limited supply due to winter season
  • Pork Loin Roasts 3-4 lbs. $5 per pound
  • Pork Shoulder Roasts 3-4 lbs. $5 per pound
  • Bone In Pork Chops $5 per pound (2 chops per package)
  • Pork Shoulder Steaks $5 per pound (2 steaks per package)
  • Pork Sausage 1 lb. packages $5 each
  • Bacon 1 lb. packages $7 each
  • Original Bratwurst 1 lb. packages $5 each
  • Andouille Rope Sausage 1 lb. packages $6 each
  • Italian Rope Sausage 1 lb. packages $6 each
  • 1/3 lb. Pork Burger Patties (4 patties per package) $5 each
  • Whole Chickens 3.5 – 4.5 lbs. average $12 each

Small Farm Systems LLC

Vegetables

  • Sweet potatoes – $1.50/pound (minimum quantity 25 pounds)

Sherry Stratman

Healthy dog treats

Small bags will be $2.50 each

Large bags will be $7.00 each

Anna’s Cashew Brittle

Cashew Brittle as:

1 oz. — $ 1.50

4 oz. — $ 4.50

8 oz. — $ 7.50

16 oz. -$14.50

The Homemade Cottage Product List

Baked Apple Roses: per rose, $2.00 (made upon request)

Breads: Gluten-Free Loaf or Rolls, $7.00; Plain or Sweet Loaf or Rolls, $5.00 (made upon request)

  • Gluten-Free
  • Plain Bread
  • Sweet bread
  • Rolls, plain or sweet
  • Bread Sticks
  • Sourdough

Brownies: (regular and Gluten-Free) each 3×3 Square, $2.00 (made upon request)

  • Plain Chocolate
  • Chocolate chips
  • Chocolate, nuts

Candied nuts:  ¼ lb bags $3.00; ½ lb bags $5.00; 1 lb bags $8.00 (made upon request)

  • Maple glazed walnuts
  • Candied Pecans
  • Glazed Pecans
  • Spiced Walnuts
  • Holiday Glazed Nuts

Cheesecakes:  Whole cake $12.00; medium cake $5.00; jar $3.00; mini $1.00 (any kind made upon request)

  • Strawberry
  • Triple berry
  • Blueberry
  • Banana
  • Coconut
  • Pear
  • Peach
  • Apple
  • Chocolate

Chocolate Bark:  1 lb $3.00 (price will depend on the amount you want – made upon request)

Chutney: 8 oz jars, $5.00 (made upon request)

Cookies:  $3.00 dozen

Dried fruit: per snack bag, $2.00 (made upon request)

Apples, pears, strawberries, bananas

Gumdrops/Jellied candies: $2.00, 10 pieces per bag

Cherry, lemon, grape, cranberry, orange, raspberry, Available in sugar-free

Jams, Jellies and Relishes: 8oz jars, $6.00 (made upon request) (S = Signature)

 All can be made sugar-free

  • Alarmingly Hot Jelly
  • Apple Butter
  • Apple Jelly
  • Apple Sage Jelly
  • Apple Sauce
  • Apricot, Dried, Jam
  • Banana Jam
  • Blackberry Jam
  • Blueberry Jam
  • Champaign Jelly
  • Cherry Jam
  • Cherry Jelly
  • Cherry Relish, Sweet
  • Cranberry Jam
  • Cranberry Walnut Jam/Splenda (S)
  • Garlic Jelly
  • Granny Smiths Preserves
  • Jelly from red and black grapes
  • Lemon & Agave Nectar Jelly (S)
  • Lemon & Honey Jelly
  • Merlot Jelly
  • Orange Marmalade
  • Pear and Peach Jam
  • Pear Butter
  • Pear Honey
  • Pear Jam
  • Pear Sauce
  • Pear Sauce with Peppercorns (S)
  • Pecan Pie Jam
  • Pepper Jelly
  • Pineapple Jam
  • Pineapple Jelly
  • Plum Ginger Jam (S)
  • Plum Jam
  • Pomegranate Jelly
  • Raspberry, Ginger, Cinnamon
  • Raspberry Jam
  • Red Bell Pepper Jam
  • Spiced Apple Jam (S)
  • Strawberry Jam
  • Tomato-Ginger Jam
  • Wine Jelly

Mustards:  4oz jars $3.00 (made upon request)

Spreads: 8oz or bigger jars, $6.00 (made upon request)

  • Garlic Spread
  • Pumpkin Spice Spread/Filling

Syrups: 10oz jars, $6.00 (made upon request)

  • Basil Lemon
  • Vanilla-Honey
  • Honey
  • Lemon
  • Crepe
  • Buttermilk
  • Pancake
  • Coconut
  • Habanero
  • Cinnamon Dolce Latte
  • Gingerbread Spiced Coffee

Tootsie Rolls: 10 cents each (made upon request)

 

What’s Fresh Saturday, May 17

pam5.10We’re ready for our third week downtown and keeping our fingers crossed for a warmer weekend.

Expect to find pasture-raised beef, pork, and eggs. Grilling season is upon us and there’s everything from steaks to bratwurst.

Spring produce is available – green onions, lettuces, greens – Swiss chard and kale, herbs and more.  Try some garlic scapes (the unopened garlic flower)- they are great grilled or added to stir fry and other dishes for a mild garlic flavor. The Rothoves will have tomatoes and cucumbers from their greenhouses. If you were early last week, you may have had a chance to pick up the first few tomatoes of the season. They weren’t on the table long!

There will be the normal great selection of baked goods – sweet potato pies, apple pies, cookies, breads, and freshly-milled grains turned into tasty breads. Mae Benson has some really tasty pre-baked pizza crusts. Pick up a cup of coffee from Bare Knuckle Roasters or a bag of fair-trade coffee from Three Story Coffee to go with all that baked goodness.

There will be jams and jellies, handmade soaps and crafts. The Gillilands will have the blueberry jam and the ever popular carrot cake jam. Have a canine friend? We even have healthy dog treats!

There will still be a few plants for sale. The Lincoln University Native Plants Program will even have plants available to attract pollinators to your garden this season. Stop by and talk to the University’s Native Plant Specialist, Dr. Nadia Navarette-Tindall, to find out more about Missouri’s native bounty.

See you this Saturday and the rest of May downtown!

What’s fresh for May 3

downtown jc

 

This week the Market will be moving downtown to Madison Street between High Street and Capitol Avenue. As many of you know, Lincoln’s campus, especially our end, gets pretty busy this time of year. There will be track meets and graduation ceremonies happening every Saturday for almost the entire month. The wonderful folks from Downtown Jefferson City offered us a home during May. Thanks to Stephanie Bell and all the wonderful merchants who helped make this possible!

The Market will run for the normal time 9:00 am to Noon. And might I suggest visiting on of the fine local restaurants for breakfast or lunch when you make the trip downtown for Market? Mmmmm….

Our regular vendors will be in full force. Expect to find pasture-raised beef, pork, chicken and eggs. Spring produce is available – green onions, lettuces, greens – Swiss chard and kale, herbs and more. There will be the normal great selection of baked goods – sweet potato pies, apple pies, cookies, breads, and freshly-milled grains turned into tasty breads. We even have healthy dog treats!

If you are looking for plants, come buy from our farmers! There will be a selection of tomatoes – heirlooms and hybrids, vegetables, herbs, and ornamentals. The Lincoln University Native Plants Program will even have plants available to attract pollinators to your garden this season.

See you this Saturday and the rest of May downtown!

Opening Day – April 19th

You don’t want to miss Opening Day. We are all keeping our fingers crossed that spring has truly arrived. Our spring vegetables may be slow in arriving because of winter’s firm grasp this year, but we will have plenty of beef, pork, chicken, eggs and baked goods. I suspect there will be some lettuce and other leafy greens. We will also have several vendors selling plants for your own gardens.

 

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So don’t miss out Saturday, April 19th. We’ll be here from 9 am to noon in the Dickinson Research Center Parking Lot.

What’s fresh – September 14

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Why buy flowers at a grocery store when you can have these local beauties?

It looks like we may be getting a little fall weather this weekend. We are also starting to see our fall vegetables. Greens like Swiss chard are returning. Squash and pumpkins have arrived. AND there are still tomatoes, peppers and sweet corn. We get the best of both worlds this time of year.

Duncan Family Farm now has their full line of brats. So, if you have been waiting for those maple/blueberry sausages to return, it’s your lucky day! They will also have sweet corn. We are all lucky!

Did you know that Invermos Valley Farms is taking pre-orders for turkeys? Yep. Stop by and chat with them. You can also discuss buying 1/2, 1/4 and 1/8 of beef to store up at home. Check out their “beef bundle” option. It’s great if you don’t have a lot of freezer space.

If you haven’t tried the goat’s milk caramels or fudge from Colleen Meredith, you are missing out on something yummy. The Merediths will also have tomatoes, cucumbers, beans and grass-fed beef.

Pam Schmutzler will have a variety of produce including the first of her fall Swiss chard, pecans, cookies and bread.

Caleb Bax will have produce and mums. He’s had some really nice pumpkins the last couple of weeks.

We will also have our normal selection of baked goods, gluten-free baked goods and bread, sourdough bread and crafts, fall bedding plants and vegetable plants, and cut flowers.

It’s supposed to be a beautiful morning. Come spend a bit of it with us.

What to do with too many hot peppers

My pepper plants have been quite prolific this year. I went a bit overboard on the planting thanks to a very generous donation from a researcher on campus who had too many young plants. I planted several varieties of serrano, poblano, habenero and jalapeno (not to mention my sweet peppers). I have a pepper problem. Peppers seemed to have found incredibly favorable conditions this growing season. When you visit the market, you will see peppers in all varieties and colors.

I’m somewhat of a food preservation junkie. I can things, I dry things, I freeze things. I preserve as much as I can during the growing season to enjoy during the winter months. But, this year I have peppers in such overwhelming abundance that it frightens me. What could I do with so many peppers? My friends and family aren’t biting. I’m not sure they enjoy my enthusiasm for spice. I was thinking I would have a freezer full of peppers, or worse they would end up in the compost pile.

hot sauce
Home-made hot sauce. Look what I made!

Then I stumbled across this on the epicurious website – a recipe for fermented pepper sauce. I, the consumate pepperhead, was ecstatic.

You are saying, “Fermented? Eww.” Do not be afraid. Like the chef says, fermentation is hip! Who am I to go against “hip”? I picked a mixture of lovely red-ripe serranos and yellow habenaros (or it may be the ghost pepper- my tags are missing). The process is simple. You may want to wear gloves, although the first step didn’t require me to mess with them too much. Blend up about a pound of peppers with a 1/2 cup of water (use recipe above). Add 1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt. Put in jar with a cloth or paper cover. Check your concoction every other day. The mold is not bad, it is natural. Remove it. Leave it alone, except for the skimming for about 10 days. Then blend with 2 cups cider vinegar, strain, and bottle. Easy Peasy. There is the added bonus of sinus-clearing fumes. Open a window, if you are sensitive.

Keep it refrigerated. I tested the pH on mine and it was well below the level required for acidified foods to be safe. However, the recipe says refrigerate, so I shall.

Oh and by the way, it is awesome! This pepperhead approves. With this first test batch proven, I will be making more. Guess what everyone is getting for Christmas!

This week’s recipe – spring vegetable and chicken stew

Last week we had a cooking class for our group of older adults, the “Roots” in our Sprouts and Roots program. It was the last class of the spring. All of our group will now be tending their garden boxes in our Community Garden. We will gather in the fall to continue classes on gardening, nutrition and well-being.

Many seniors in our community don’t get the chance to eat as healthy as they would like. Sometimes there’s just not enough time in the day, or age makes the effort to cook difficult. Some in our group are now faced with becoming the cook, when for years that was someone else’s responsibility. So, our last class focused on one dish meals with minimum prep time. This recipe is centered around vegetables available right now (many at the market!). The asparagus came from our plot in the Community Garden. I was hoping for some leftovers. There were none. This is a great recipe for anyone short on time.

Spring Vegetable and Chicken Stew

  • Serves: 6
  • Total Time: 5 hours
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes

Ingredients

1 ½ pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs, cut into chunks

2 cups baby carrots, halved lengthwise

1 large leek, white and light green parts only, sliced (2 cups)

1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon

32 ounces low sodium chicken broth (1 box)

1 tablespoon flour

½ teaspoon salt

8 ounces fresh asparagus, trimmed, cut in to 1 inch to 2 inch lengths

1/3 cup peas (if frozen, thaw first)

Directions

  1. Put chicken, carrots, leeks and tarragon in slow-cooker. Pour in chicken broth, reserving 1/3 cup aside. Mix 1/3 cup chicken broth, flour and salt. Pour into slow cooker; toss to coat. Cover and cook on low 5 to 8 hours until chicken and vegetables are tender.
  2. Turn to high. Add asparagus and peas; cover and cook on high 10 to 15 minutes until asparagus are crisp-tender.
  3. Serve with cooked noodles or rice, if you desire. Or better yet, pick up some new baby potatoes and toss them in at the beginning.